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 Post subject: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:18 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Germany
1. I always wondered, why Rickenbacker changed their guitarnecks from 21 to 24 frets.
It moves the neck-pickup more back towards the bridge-pickup and therefore turns down the guitar's sharp look, where the fretboard ends right at the edge of the body's front. To my opinion 24 frets are really not needed on a 12-string guitar.
2. Those older Ric's had these nice triangle-positionmarkers that covered the whole width of the fretboard. They looked so much prettier than the current inlays :(
3. The look of the "toaster-pickups" was just another Rickenbacker trademark.

Why did you change all these unique Rickenbacker looks?

If you take a look at a contemporary Fender Stratocaster, you will find, that Fender even changed the headstock and the Fender decal to it's 50s style. They extended the fretboard from 21 frets to 22 only to keep up with their ingenious design. Even Gibson did not try to make 24-fret Les Pauls and didn't change their "crown-inlays".

It would have been much smarter to make the fretboards of your 12-string guitars wider instead of "longer". Also should be all 12-string guitars equipped with a fully adjustable bridge for better intonation.

With best regards
Klaus


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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:29 am 
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Location: Santa Ana, CA
Quote:
1. I always wondered, why Rickenbacker changed their guitarnecks from 21 to 24 frets. . . To my opinion 24 frets are really not needed on a 12-string guitar.
This was a trend in the marketplace some years ago and we followed it. Personally I have no use for any more than 21 frets, even on a six string but it was something our customers requested.
Quote:
2. Those older Ric's had these nice triangle-positionmarkers that covered the whole width of the fretboard. They looked so much prettier than the current inlays.
Sure, they look nice. Too bad the full width markers make the fingerboard about 40% weaker and tend to crack much easier.
Quote:
3. The look of the "toaster-pickups" was just another Rickenbacker trademark.
You must have overlooked the vintage pickup option we offer- you like 'em, you order 'em.
Quote:
Why did you change all these unique Rickenbacker looks?
It's called evolution and it's something we've been doing for 75 years and will continue to do. For those like you that can't handle that, we offer the V and C Series instruments so you can get exactly what you want.
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It would have been much smarter to make the fretboards of your 12-string guitars wider instead of "longer". Also should be all 12-string guitars equipped with a fully adjustable bridge for better intonation.
You've just contradicted yourself but letting that go, thank you for your opinion. Perhaps when our backlog reduces, say to 6 months or less, we'll consider that the market is ready for change like this.


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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:46 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 70
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
That's really interesting about the larger inlays affecting the structural integrity of the guitar. I've always liked the traditional look of the larger inlays, but adding strength to the instrument is a trade off that makes a lot of sense. Just when I thought I knew everything about this guitar of mine...!


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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:48 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 279
Location: Lexington, KY
Personally, I agree with both of you on the number of frets... heck, on my 12-string I rarely venture above the 10th. The wider boards would be nice though. ;-)

I presonally prefer the look and functionality of the newer-style triangles. More wood is always better and they have a more precision appearance close-up.

On the toasters... not only is there a C and V series, but also the VP option... AND don't forget that Hi-Gains came about somewhere around '67 from what I've seen. Considering that the "golden age" of Ric was '64-'70ish, Hi-Gains are at least as vintage correct as toasters.


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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 4:53 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Germany
Thanks for your quick reply!

If asking for a wider fretboard and a fully adjustable bridge on a 12-string guitar is contradictious , I can live with it! Really....!
I'm quite sure that a 12-string guitar, which is easier to play will become widely appreciated amongst guitarplayers,
especially if it is a Rickenbacker 12-string guitar.

Regards
Klaus



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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 5:16 am 
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Location: Santa Ana, CA
I guess all I was saying is that it appeared you were a purist as far as the original designs but at the same time were looking for changes you personally liked. Then another person likes their guitars a certain way but also wants some changes they like, which might be different than your preference, and we're going in circles.

Anyway, that's precisely why we make modern models that ARE evolving, alongside vintage replicas that are snapshots of those models at specific points in time.


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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 5:31 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Germany
wouldn't be improved playability or better intonation when playing the higher registers kind of an evolution?

You're right, I'm kind of a purist, but only if the traditional looks of an instrument are concerned.
I'd never turn down any technical improvement as long it doesn't change the design.

A wider fretboard on your guitars is hardly recognizable as would be a bridge with 12 individual saddles.

By the way, you'll change the headstock on your 12-strings, well done....!

What bridge is installed on the 360/12C63?

Klaus


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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 8:58 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2005 2:00 pm
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Location: Kansas
Quote:
What bridge is installed on the 360/12C63?


The bridge on the 360/12C63 is a 6-way split saddle. George Harrison said this about his first Rickenbacker 360/12, "I used to play it in concerts for years and it never gave me any trouble."

You can find a bridge with 12 individual saddles on the market if it's a modification you need to make. For bridge information on this website, go to the boutique tab, then click on bridges.



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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 10:59 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 103
Location: Teignmouth, UK
The 21 vs 24 fret debate seems to be split down the middle. I don't have a use for 24 frets, but the closer pickup spacing really suits the hi-gains IMO...on a 21 fret neck, they lose a little definition (I've tried!). Conversely, again IMO, the 7.4 toasters don't seem to be at their best on a 24 fret neck, as the spacing makes them a little 'hard' to my ears, but on a 21 fret neck with the wider spacing, the full tone can be fully appreciated, especially the extra bottom end warmth.

I've always said toasters for 21 fret necks & hi-gains for 24. That's why I'll always have both types in my arsenal & am grateful that both are available.


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 Post subject: Re: 24-fret necks and others
 Post Posted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 2:58 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 370
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Klaus- It would appear that the 660-12 is right up your alley. It has all the vintage features that appeal to you. In addition, the 21-fret neck is 1.75" wide at the nut versus 1.63" wide on the standard models. It also has the modern truss-rod improvement. I used to have a heck of a time adjusting my old Ricks, but the new rod system makes it much easier. See, you aren't so hard to please after all! -Dr.Phil


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