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 Post subject: Re: Can it be polished?
 Post Posted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 11:37 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 30, 2018 2:09 pm
Posts: 37
CJJ if I was going to make a very small touch up and I mean small on a Mapleglo finish do you think I could get away with using nitrocellulose ?


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 Post subject: Re: Can it be polished?
 Post Posted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:58 am
Posts: 1336
Location: En Zed
I'm no expert on repairs or refinishing, but I've read that nitrocellulose lacquer (use clear nail polish) can work for really small dings. The problem is that it won't adhere with the CV very well. It it's a tiny chip, it can help protect the wood for a while...


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 Post subject: Re: Can it be polished?
 Post Posted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 11:47 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 30, 2018 2:09 pm
Posts: 37
I've used the nitrocellulose on the small chip and it looks fine. I just need to build it up a bit and then smooth it off with meguiars scratch remover.
I think it will be fine.


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 Post subject: Re: Can it be polished?
 Post Posted: Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:17 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Hermosa Beach CA
I would absolutely NOT try lacquer as a touchup material!.

Two problems with trying to touch up with lacquer (nitrocellulose or acrylic - they have the same properties as far as adhesion/touch up/film thickness):

1. It does not adhere well to polyurethanes, polyesters or conversion varnishes. That's why lacquer finish systems are built up from different lacquer formulations - sealers. primers, color coats, toners and clear coats. The solvent content causes them to all melt into each other creating one inseparable coat of lacquer - this is also why lacquer flows out so smoothly.

2. Lacquers are EXTREMELY low in solids and individual coats are very thin. If you try to apply thicker to fill in it tends to skin over on top and entrap solvents. This will really slow the dry time and, if any moisture is also trapped, cause blush.

But mainly, those properties make it unlikely to "self-level" and fill/smooth the entire surface.

Thin superglue (not the retail stuff - bulk packaged glue with special applicators can be found at Rockler and on Amazon - I use Starbond brand.) can be used to "drop fill" with pen and hypodermic type applicators; leveling is achieved with small turned-edge cabinet scrapers or single-edge razor blades with turned-edge center sections
and a couple of wraps of cellophane tape for both surface clearance and to prevent abrasive damage.


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